My Blog
By Century Ear, Nose, Throat, Head & Neck Surgery
February 20, 2020
Category: ENT Care
Tags: Skin   Dermabrasion   Chemical peels  

As we age, the skin loses it's natural luminosity, because of dryness, damage, or slow cell turnover. Fortunately, there are many cosmetic treatments available that offer rejuvenation and improve the natural glow. If you'd like to look and feel younger by eliminating wrinkles, discolorations, and more, the providers here at Century Ear Nose and Throat offer facial plastic surgery options to improve your look.

To learn more about our skin surface procedures, read below, and to discuss them in detail, schedule a consultation at one of our three locations in Orland Park, Evergreen Park, and New Lenox, IL.

Common Skin Surface Procedures

If you require more youthful skin, these are only a few of the non-invasive procedures we provide to enhance its elasticity and improve hydration. Depending on the technology, you may remove acne or surgical scars, wrinkles, brighten skin, and repair its tone:

  • Dermabrasion - a powerful rotating instrument that precisely removes the layers of skin damage
  • Chemical peels - a chemical solution is brushed onto the skin and is left to soak before the layers are gradually peeled away
  • Laser resurfacing - wavelengths of light safely penetrate the skin to encourage new collagen growth and restore firmness

Which Procedure Is Right for You?

The skin is the body's largest organ, and taking care of it is a significant task. Here at Century Ear Nose and Throat, our providers offer ten different facial plastic surgery procedures to assist in rehabilitating the surface, shape, and structure of the skin. During a consultation, we will determine the best procedure for your condition after performing a physical assessment at one of our offices in Orland Park, Evergreen Park, and New Lenox, IL.

Interested? Give Us a Call

For more information about facial plastic surgery, the other conditions we treat, and services provided here at Century Ear Nose and Throat, dial (708) 460-0007 today to schedule an appointment at one of our offices in Orland Park, Evergreen Park, or New Lenox, IL.

By Century Ear, Nose, Throat, Head & Neck Surgery
January 31, 2020
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: Dizziness  

It’s normal to experience bouts of dizziness if we are stressed, taking certain medications or haven’t eaten in a while; however, what might be going on if your dizziness persists? Dizziness isn’t an uncommon symptom. In fact, most people will experience dizziness that is serious enough to warrant seeing a doctor. While you may visit a family physician to find out what’s going on, don’t be surprised if you end up being referred to an ear, nose & throat doctor.

What causes dizziness?

Dizziness refers to a serious of sensations that make you feel lightheaded, off balance, unsteady or feeling like the world around you is spinning (vertigo). Sometimes dizziness may be accompanied by nausea and vomiting, particularly during more severe episodes. These symptoms can be unnerving but an otolaryngologist can often help.

The most common causes of dizziness that we see include:

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV): This problem affects the inner ear and can lead to persistent episodes of vertigo. Symptoms usually last no more than a minute and will typically come and go. Unfortunately, there often is no cause of BPPV; however, sometimes migraines or inner ear damage may be to blame. Sometimes this condition will go away on its own but an ENT doctor can also provide you with treatment options such as physical therapy that can get rid of symptoms sooner.

Vestibular neuronitis: Inflammation of the eight cranial nerve, known as the vestibular nerve, results in severe vertigo episodes that may cause you to lose balance. This condition can also cause nausea and vomiting. Symptoms usually last anywhere from 7 to 10 days and become milder over the course of several months. A viral or bacterial infection is usually to blame for inflammation of the vestibular nerve.

There are certain medications that can be prescribed by an ENT specialist to help lessen the severity and duration of your symptoms. Sometimes a special type of physical therapy is performed to treat this condition.

Labyrinthitis: This inner ear disorder occurs when one of the two vestibular nerves becomes inflamed. Along with dizziness, vertigo, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and nausea you may also lose hearing in one ear. Any changes to your hearing warrant immediate medical attention. Viral, respiratory, and bacterial infections can all cause this disorder.

Medications such as corticosteroids, sedatives and antihistamines may be prescribed to help with your symptoms. Just like with vestibular neuronitis, a type of physical therapy known as vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) may also be recommended.

Meniere disease: This progressive inner ear condition also causes similar symptoms to labyrinthitis including tinnitus, hearing loss, pressure in the ears, and dizziness. Symptoms will gradually get worse over time, and these attacks may also cause a rapid pulse, blurry vision and anxiety.

While there is no cure, there are treatment options that can effectively manage your dizziness and also reduce fluid in the ear. Medications such as steroids, motion sickness medicines, and diuretics are often used, as well as rehabilitation, therapy, hearing aids, and sometimes surgery.

If you are dealing with dizziness or any other warning signs of an ear problem it’s a good time to turn to an ENT doctor who can help you find the right treatment to get you back on two steady feet again.

By Century Ear, Nose, Throat, Head & Neck Surgery
December 19, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: Sinus Surgery  

Acute sinusitis can be a miserable condition for many. Characterized by inflammation in the lining of your nose and sinuses, the condition can make it hard to drain the mucus from your nose, causing difficulty and pain while sleeping and breathing.

If you and your doctor have tried antibiotics, antihistamines, nasal sprays, or flushing treatments to treat your acute sinusitis to no avail, it may be time to ask Dr. Brian Farrell of Century Ear, Nose and Throat, Head and Neck Surgery in Orland Park, IL, about sinus surgery options.

Before recommending any sort of surgery, we will go over your medical history at our Orland Park office and diagnose the source of your sinusitis, using scans or tests to ensure any procedure will be safe and effective at addressing the cause. Here are some of the nasal surgery options that we offer at our Orland Park office:

Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS)

This procedure uses an endoscope, a slim fiber-optic tube, to examine the sinus openings and remove any tissues that are causing blockage. This sinus surgery is done entirely through the nostrils, which allows for quicker healing and less discomfort. Nasal packing or nasal irrigation may be recommended follow-ups to FESS.

Caldwell Luc operation

Named for an American physician and a French laryngologist, this sinus surgery is commonly used when there is a tumor in the sinus cavity. A more invasive surgery, your doctor at our Orland Park office will reach your maxillary sinus, under the eye, by entering through your upper jaw above one of your molar teeth. An opening will be created to allow for better sinus drainage.

Image-guided surgery

This high-tech method is best for severe cases of acute sinusitis. Using CT scanning and infrared signals, we can very precisely navigate the sinus passage to remove or fix the tissue causing your sinus problems.

Need medical care? Give us a call

If you are suffering from acute sinusitis and find that previous treatments and remedies are providing you no relief, call Century Ear, Nose and Throat, Head and Neck Surgery in Orland Park at 708-460-0007 to schedule a consultation. We are committed to helping you breathe easy.

By Century Ear, Nose, Throat, Head & Neck Surgery
December 13, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology

Just like breathing or blinking, swallowing is an involuntary habit that we don’t often think about; however, swallowing is an important part of everything from speaking and socializing to consuming delicious food. Unfortunately, there are disorders that can affect a person’s ability to swallow. A swallowing disorder can be uncomfortable and troublesome, and a visit to an otolaryngologist can give you the answers you’re looking for as to what’s going on.

Some people having pain when they swallow while others may have trouble swallowing certain foods or feel as if there is something stuck in their throat. As a result, they may have trouble getting the proper nutrients and calories they need. Swallowing disorders are more common as a person ages. Swallowing disorders usually fit into one of two categories: esophageal and oropharnygeal dysphagia.

Esophageal dysphagia

People who often feel like they have something in their throats are often dealing with esophageal dysphagia as a result of:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD)
  • Esophageal spasms
  • Achalasia (esophageal sphincter dysfunction)
  • Scar tissue of the esophagus
  • Tumors
  • Certain medications that can cause dry mouth

Oropharnygeal dysphagia

There are certain conditions that can also affect how the muscles in the throat function, which makes it more difficult to swallow food properly. Common causes include neurological disorders, nerve damage (spinal cord or brain injuries) and cancers of the head, neck, and throat.

Along with trouble swallowing, those with swallowing disorders may also experience:

  • Coughing after swallowing
  • The sensation of food being stuck in the throat
  • Choking
  • Regurgitation
  • Sore throat
  • Hoarseness
  • Chest discomfort

If you experience persistent issues swallowing or if you also experience vomiting, regurgitation, or unexpected weight loss along with swallowing difficulties then it’s time to see an otolaryngologist.

Diagnosing Swallowing Disorders

To determine the cause of a patient’s swallowing problems their ENT doctor will go through their medical history, ask questions about the symptoms they are experiencing and then perform a physical examination. Based on the patient’s answers, your doctor will then determine which testing is needed to make a diagnosis. Common diagnostic tests include:

  • Endoscopy
  • Esophageal muscle test (manometry)
  • CT scan
  • Dynamic swallowing study
  • Barium esophagram
  • 24-hour pH impedance (to evaluate acid reflux and regurgitation)

Treating Swallowing Disorders

As you can see from the list above, there are many conditions and causes that could result in swallowing disorders. Therefore, the treatment you receive will depend on the cause and severity of your symptoms. Your ENT specialist will work with you to create an individualized treatment plan to reduce symptoms. With chronic conditions, your doctor will find ways to help you manage the underlying condition to make swallowing easier.

By Century Ear, Nose, Throat, Head & Neck Surgery
November 22, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: Nosebleeds  

Nosebleeds happen to most of us at some point during our lifetime. While it can be startling, nosebleeds are typically harmless and nothing to worry about. Of course, if you battle nosebleeds rather regularly you may be wondering what’s going on and whether you should turn to an otolaryngologist for an evaluation. Here’s what you should know about getting a nosebleed.

Common Causes of a Nosebleed

The blood vessels within our nose are very delicate, which means that they are prone to bursting and causing nosebleeds. Therefore, the two most common causes of nosebleeds are nose picking and dry air. Dry air can dry out the nasal passages, which leaves the area prone to infection and cracking.

Other causes include:

  • Repeated nose blowing
  • Allergies
  • Broken nose
  • Acute or chronic sinusitis (a sinus infection)
  • Common cold
  • Irritants
  • Certain allergy medications (these medications can dry out the nose)
  • Traumatic injury to the nose
  • Deviated septum
  • Bleeding disorders
  • High altitude
  • Excessive use of blood thinners or anti-inflammatory medications

There are two main types of nosebleeds: anterior and posterior. An anterior nosebleed is a bleed that originates in the septum of the nose (the wall that separates the two nasal passages). These nosebleeds are minor and can be treated with home care. If your child experiences nosebleeds an anterior nosebleed is usually the cause.

Posterior nosebleeds occur further back in the nose where the artery branches are located. This type of nosebleed is much heavier, occurs more often in adults and may require medical care. While rare, it is possible for a posterior nosebleed to be a sign of high blood pressure or a blood disorder (e.g. hemophilia).

When to See a Doctor

While most people will be able to treat a simple nosebleed on their own without having to seek medical care, it’s important to see a doctor right away if:

  • Your nosebleed is affecting your ability to breath
  • Bleeding lasts more than 20 minutes
  • Your nosebleed is the result of a traumatic injury or accident
  • There is a significant amount of blood

While it’s not considered an emergency situation, it is a good idea to talk with your ENT doctor if you or your child experiences nosebleeds often. During an evaluation an ear, nose and throat doctor can ask you questions about your symptoms, perform a quick examination of the nose and determine the underlying cause of your persistent nosebleeds.

If you are concerned about you or your child’s nosebleeds then it’s best to play it safe and to schedule an appointment with an otolaryngologist. Call our office today.





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.